AWARENESS

Wherever we go, our city is being taken from us.
–Josette Bailey

 

SLAVERS OF NEW YORK USES STICKERS TO UNVEIL NYC’S HIDDEN HISTORY OF SLAVERY

128 WEST SEVENTEENTH
STREET

This unassuming Chelsea building was a decades-long Black community pillar spanning the years of the Civil War, the postbellum Reconstruction Era and New York’s gritty-bordered Gilded Age.

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The Legacy of Colored School No. 4

with Eric K. Washington on view here:

https://youtu.be/yuvFGkh3RFM

 

Tap the logo to subscribe to NYC Department of Records and Information Services:

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To expose the legacy of slavery in New York City, independent artists, educators, and researchers Elsa Eli Waithe, Maria Robles, and Ada Reso formed Slavers of New York. Using historical data and public art, Slavers of New York aims to educate New Yorkers about the city’s history of slavery to encourage public atonement through knowledge.

 

As the American novelist Ralph Ellison once stated, “perhaps more than any other people, Americans have been locked in a deadly struggle with time, with history. We’ve fled the past and trained ourselves to suppress, if not forget, troublesome details of the national memories.”

Read the full article at untappedcities.com

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Mayor Adams Proposes to Slash Staff and Budget for Landmarks Preservation Commission

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Photo: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office

Mayor Adams’ recently released draft proposed budget includes a steep cut to the funding and staffing of the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). The LPC is already the smallest city agency, charged with overseeing tens of thousands of landmarked properties across New York City, and surveying hundreds of thousands more to ensure that historically significant sites are protected. The Mayor’s proposed budget would slash the tiny agency’s staffing of approximately 80 positions by six.

The LPC is arguably under-resourced now, as it has slowed considerably its rate of designations and failed to adequately oversee and protect historic properties already within its portfolio. Further cuts to the agency will only diminish its ability to proactively protect endangered historic properties, and ensure that the varied and diverse histories of New York City are honored and recognized, and that existing designated properties receive the careful attention they deserve.

The Mayor’s budget for the city must ultimately be negotiated and approved by the City Council. 


TO HELP:

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ONE45
DEVELOPMENT 
IN HARLEM

THIS PROJECT IS NON-FEASIBLE, UNREALISTIC, AND INAPPROPRIATE FOR THIS COMMUNITY

WHAT IS HAPPENING

Community Board 10 Rejects One45 Development, a project that will include two 363-foot-tall towers at the corner of 145th Street and Lenox Avenue.

According to Patch, newly elected Councilmember Kristin Richardson Jordan has come out strongly against this development, arguing it would displace Black residents and contribute to Harlem's gentrification.

Community Board 10 unanimously voted down the two-tower project, which now heads to Borough President Mark Levine.

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The "One45" development is proposed for the corner of Lenox Avenue and West 145th Street.

 

The project by developer Bruce Teitelbaum will include two 363-foot-tall towers, a civil rights museum and a headquarters for the National Action Network. (NYC Planning/SHoP Architects)

TO LEARN MORE

Read the Article by Nick Garber

The current plan needs to be reformatted.

The “affordable units” need to be 2-3 bedrooms (not the current studio and 1 bedroom) so that families can live there, and more units need to be allocated.

The height of the towers should be reduced from the proposed 22 floors, and environmental factors need to be considered as well as the impact on local infrastructure like the nearby 3 Train station at 145th Street, whose small platform fits only six subway cars.

Also, intervention and mediation needs to occur so that this project doesn’t cause the displacement of existing residents.

SAVE HISTORIC MIDTOWN

TELL ALBANY LEGISLATORS TO STOP THE HOCHUL-VORNADO PENN STATION SKYSCRAPER PROJECT

WHAT IS HAPPENING

There is a plan to declare the area around Penn Station “blighted” and impose ten new skyscrapers around New York City’s Penn Station neighborhood.

The project - called the Empire Station Complex - merely grants Vornado the right to break the zoning code and build to excessive height with unneeded supertalls.

 

Vornado is one of the country’s largest real estate investment trusts and was former Governor Cuomo's single largest donor.

WHAT IS IN DANGER OF BEING LOST

7 Penn Plaza, St. John the Baptist Church, Fairmont Building, Penn Station Service Building, The Stewart Hotel, Hotel Pennsylvania, Gimbels Department Store, and Gimbels Skybridge.

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Hotel Pennsylvania and Gimbels Skybridge. Credit: David Holowka

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WHAT YOU CAN DO

SIGN THE PETITION at ALLIANCE FOR A HUMAN-SCALE CITY

INQUIRE

Visit constituent organization websites and learn more about what they are doing to shape a better citizen-centric future for New York.

DONATE

Give to whichever Coalition organization best fits your beliefs as to stopping this project. Public awareness campaigns cost money.

The Empire Station Coalition is comprised of the 29th Street Association, City Club of NY, CNU NYC, Council of Chelsea Block Associations, Environmental Simulation Center, Historic Districts Council, Human-Scale NYC, RethinkNYC, Limited Equity and Affordability at Penn South (LEAPS), Midtown South Community Council, Penn-Area Residents Committee, Save Chelsea, TakeBackNYC, and the Victorian Society of New York.

TO LEARN MORE

The Empire Station Coalition sponsored a walking tour led by Brad Vogel and Justin Rivers of endangered sites in the Penn Station Neighborhood.

 

Brad is a respected member of the New York City Preservation Community.

Justin Rivers of Untapped New York is a tour guide for many New York City sites with a particular focus on Penn Station. Justin authored the play “The Eternal Space” about the once-great Penn Station. 

To learn about some of the endangered sites, read Past & Future of the Penn District, the guide from the walking tour:

Village Preservation Reports: Plan to Lift Limit on Size of Residential Development in NYC Is Rejected

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Assembly and Senate Reject Governor's Proposal to Eliminate Residential FAR Cap and Allow for Supersized Development, But Final Outcome For Budget Proposal Still To Be Determined

Village Preservation reports that thanks to the advocacy of thousands of you, both the State Assembly and Senate rejected Governor Hochul’s proposal to include in the new state budget an elimination of the cap on the size of new residential development. 

This proposal would have allowed NYC to lift the current limit of 12 FAR (floor area ratio) on the size of new residential developments (for context, the 1000+-ft.-tall supertalls of Billionaire’s Row in Midtown were built with zoning allowing a residential FAR of 10). 

 

This is a major victory in our efforts to prevent adoption of this measure, which would have allowed NYC to upzone areas to well above currently allowable levels, overwhelming infrastructure and creating vastly oversized development.

But the battle is not over. While the Assembly and Senate’s refusal to include the measure in their budget proposals makes the chances of its adoption through the budget process much less likely, it is still possible.

 

The Governor, Assembly, and Senate must still work out a final budget deal by April 1, which involves each side compromising on their current proposals.

 

Eleventh-hour horse trades and back-room deals will be made, and real estate interests have been pushing for this change for years.

 

Proponents have falsely claimed this measure is necessary to allow conversions of underutilized office buildings or hotels to residences and to create affordable housing. 

 

It is not; such conversions can take place regardless, and this measure does not require or guarantee a single unit of affordable housing being created.

If this measure is approved, we will likely see upzonings to above 12 FAR for residential neighborhoods that developers have long eyed.

 

The recent developer giveaway SoHo/NoHo/Chinatown rezoning included allowances for up to 12 FAR in all three neighborhoods; if the cap were lifted, no doubt the allowance would have gone even higher.

TO HELP: